What Is Tashkent Agreement

» Posted by on Dec 20, 2020 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

An agreement signed by Indian Prime Minister Lal Bahadur Shastri and Pakistani President Ayub Khan in the Soviet city of Tashkent to end the Second Indo-Pakistan War on Kashmir. The two countries agreed not only to withdraw their troops from the territory of the other region and to recover their prisoners of war, but also to begin to normalize their diplomatic relations. Unfortunately, the beginning of Indo-Pakistani friendly relations was made more difficult by Shastri`s death a few hours after the signing of the agreement. The agreement has done little to ease the deep hostility between the two countries since independence in 1947 and did not prevent the outbreak of new hostilities in 1970. In India, the people also criticized the agreement because the Pakistani president and the Indian prime minister did not sign a guerrilla pact in Kashmir. After the day of this declaration, Prime Minister Lal Bahadur died on the day of a sudden heart attack. After him, no one accepted this statement, and it was ignored by the next government. The declaration only ended the hostilities between India and Pakistan, but left the issue of Kashmir between the two, and neither side has been able to reach an agreement to date. IX The Indian Prime Minister and the President of Pakistan agreed that the parties would continue to meet at the highest and other levels on issues of immediate importance to both countries. Both sides recognized the need for joint Indo-Pakistani bodies to report to their governments to decide what further action should be taken.

The first Indo-Pakistan War, known as the First Kashmir War (October 22, 1947-January 5, 1949), took place shortly after the independence of India and Pakistan. A ceasefire agreement has led to the establishment of the Line of Control (LOC) as the de facto border between India and Pakistan in Kashmir. VI The Indian Prime Minister and the President of Pakistan agreed to consider measures to restore economic and trade relations, communication and cultural exchanges between India and Pakistan and to take steps to implement existing agreements between India and Pakistan. The agreement was negotiated by Soviet Prime Minister Alexei Kosygin, who had invited the parties to Tashkent. The parties agreed to remove all armed forces from positions that were occupied before August 5, 1965; Renewing diplomatic relations; and to discuss economic, refugee and other issues. The agreement was criticized in India because it contained no war pact or renouncement of guerrilla aggression in Kashmir. In accordance with Tashkent`s statement, ministerial talks were held on 1 and 2 March 1966. Despite the fact that these talks were unproductive, diplomatic exchanges continued in the spring and summer. The results of these discussions were not obtained due to differences of opinion on the Kashmir issue.

The news of Tashkent`s statement shocked the people of Pakistan, who expected India to make more concessions than they got.

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